Harvard Study Shows Consuming Foods Rich In Flavonoids — Including Red Wine — Can Curb Weight Gain In Older Adults

Recent studies have shown diets that include wine can improve heart health. Now, a review of several large studies has found strong evidence of a link between keeping trim and the polyphenolic compounds found in wine and many fruits and vegetables.

Flavonoids are naturally occurring compounds that are found in specific fruits and vegetables, including grapes, blueberries, apples, pears and prunes.

The three-study analysis conducted by researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at the eating patterns of more than 120,000 participants to determine whether foods rich in flavonoids had any effects on managing body weight.

 

 

Researchers looked at diet, exercise and lifestyle data from middle-aged and older people. They found that those who ate diets rich in flavonoid-filled foods maintained their weight better than people who didn’t, even after adjusting for smoking and fitness activities. Some even lost a little weight.

The Harvard study centered on seven specific subclasses of flavonoids. Wine, especially red wine, is high in dietary flavonoids. The principal flavonoids consumed by the participants were anthocyanins, which were derived from blueberries and strawberries, flavan-3-ols, acquired from beer, tea and apples, and flavones from oranges, onions, teas, beer and wine.

Earlier studies revealed that flavonoids might increase energy expenditure, decrease fat absorption and work as an anti-inflammatory, along with with showing antioxidant qualities.

The researchers observed a significant correlation between a diet that is heavy in fruits, vegetables and flavonoid-heavy drinks, and participants who were healthier overall and less overweight.

 It’s important to note that flavonoids aren’t some miracle weight loss cure. Instead, they’re a way to curb your natural weight gain as you grow older.

So how much weight can you expect not to gain when taking more flavonoids?

Researchers observed that every extra daily standard deviation — a unit that varied by produce type — of flavonoids was associated with 0.16 to 0.23 pounds of less weight gained over 4 years.

While the study was observational, the authors expressed hope that people might eat more fruit if they knew a favorite berry helps with weight loss. Most Americans eat less than a cup of fruit and less than two cups of vegetables a day, research has shown.

Don’t feel like eating fruits or vegetables today? Why not pour yourself a glass of red wine? Red wine contains many of the same flavonoid benefits as grapes and grape juice. A single glass can provide you with high levels of anthocyanins along with flavonoids such as quercetin and myricetin.

Being obese or overweight decreases your life expectancy since it increases your risk for chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

So take your mother’s advice: Eat your fruits and vegetables. You may live longer — or at least earn a new wardrobe.


Considerations Before Hosting an Event a Holman Ranch

We’re thrilled you’re considering Holman Ranch for your upcoming event. To help with the planning process, please review the following tips and reminders about hosting an event at this private estate.

Décor Safety

You’re welcome to create a soft, romantic ambience with real candles, as long as the flames are contained within the vessel and are not higher than the container. Please skip the confetti, sparklers, birdseed or rice, as they are not permitted on the property.

Décor Set Up

Enjoy the creative freedom to dress up the venue in your own special way. To preserve the beauty of the newly remodeled historic estate, it is required that decor is never permanently secured with items such as nails, screws, tacks, tape (unless it’s painters tape), etc…

Noise Curfew

Dance and celebrate to your hearts’ content until 10:00pm. Keep in mind that all legal venues have a curfew. Holman Ranch is a legal outdoor facility in a residential neighborhood and must comply with a use permit and the Monterey County noise decibel limits. This means that all music must end by 10:00pm sharp and cannot exceed 85db at 50 feet.

To extend the celebration past 10:00pm, consider hosting an after party at Will’s Fargo Restaurant and Bar, our sister restaurant; conveniently located down the street in Carmel Valley Village.

Vendors & Caterers

You have the flexibility to select your own licensed and insured vendors. If a chosen vendor is not on the preferred vendor list, please kindly obtain approval in writing first.

Event Insurance Required

Day-of liability insurance is required for every event. A list of providers and instructions is available for reference.

Wine & Spirits

The corkage fee is waived for each event with the purchase of a minimum order of Holman Ranch estate wine. All alcohol must be served by a licensed and insured bartending or catering company. Ask about Holman Ranch beverage packages and services for your special event.


10 Reasons Why Choosing From a Preferred Wedding Professional List is Key to a Successful Wedding

Reserving a private estate in a new location for (potentially) hundreds of people can bring a plethora of obstacles. As a top-notch wedding venue in Carmel Valley, we get asked a number of questions by couples looking to organize bits of their own wedding; including questions such as:

“I have a friend who owns a business that can help with floral arrangements. Is that allowed?“

“My friend is a bartender. Can he serve our alcohol for the reception?”

“Can I pick my own wedding planner?”

Trying to save money while creating the ideal wedding you’ve always dreamed of is sometimes easier said than done.

The truth of the matter is that using your own vendors can actually cost you more money and cause far more stress than you anticipated. How can you avoid this problem? Use vendors recommended by your venue or the venue’s services themselves.

For example, a Carmel Valley wedding professional who has worked with the venue before will know the ins and outs of the location, allowing them to plan effectively and efficiently; whereas someone new to the area is prone to mistakes, damages and poor planning.

Rather than talking about why it’s best to choose a vendor that has been recommended by the venue you’ve chosen, it may be more helpful if I share 8 real life mishaps caused by vendors that were new to a venue.

1. Staffing Issues with Caterers

Your caterer being understaffed can cause problems for you and can hurt the quality of the service they provide. If the preparation area is not near the reception then transporting items not only requires more effort on the caterer’s part but also runs the risk of your food getting cold and service running slow.

2. Damage Caused by Caterers

The biggest reason you are likely to incur additional charges is due to catering companies causing damage to the property because they lack respect for the location they’re working in or generally do not care.

Here are just a small handful of examples of damage that might accidently occur:

  • Oil spills on driveway
  • Blocking pipes with grease poured down sink
  • Not disposing of trash properly
  • Generally leaving the venue in a poor state
  • Not cleaning china and flatware

3. Driving & Parking Area Damages

Using your own vendors will likely mean they are unfamiliar with the venue itself, driving in areas where they aren’t allowed.

Low hanging branches knocked off trees, knocking out lights and generally disrupting the landscape are common occurrences that take place because vendors are new to the site.

There’s nothing worse than finding the ideal place to get married only to have the perfect tree you wanted your first kiss as a married couple to take place under, ruined by a careless truck driver.

4. Damage to Lawns

Carmel Valley is typically sunny which means that we pride ourselves in our native gardens and lawns where wedding ceremonies likely take place.

Unfortunately, due to a lack of communication and explanation of the venue’s rules with your chosen rental companies, damage can be caused even with the proper precautions not being taken. Guess who foots the bill for those damages? You!

5. Experience

If you decide to go it alone and pick your own vendors you may run the risk of not being familiar enough with the challenges of an outdoor event space.

When having an event outdoors; whether it be a garden, public park or even someone’s backyard, there are a lot of things to consider:

  • Is your caterer familiar with creating kitchens outdoors?
  • Are there enough power sources or a generator to accommodate?
  • Do you have a tent prepared just in case of inclement weather?

If you pick a recommended vendor then these questions are much easier to answer since they have the experience and the know-how.

6. Transportation Issues

Whether it be valet services or shuttle companies, a number of issues can occur due to poor planning.

Not having enough attendants can lead to guests being stuck in their vehicle as they wait their turn for valet. Companies may not account for the length of a driveway or the distance from the actual car park so imprecise numbers of staff can lead to problems.

Since you are dealing with a new location, attendants may not show or get lost. Shuttle bus drivers can suffer the same problem. Despite technological advances, like GPS and iPhones, these issues still arise.

7. Policies of Rental Companies

While we deal with planning weddings all year round, you on the other hand may not be so rehearsed with the questions you should be asking your rental company. Questions like:

  • What’s the delivery window and are there fees?
  • Does the venue require that all rentals be removed by a certain time?
  • Does the quote include any extra fees?

8. Rental Companies Forgetting Items

If the company you hire forgets one or two items for your wedding, chances are, they will not get said items to you until it’s too late. Why is this? Unfortunately, venues and planners have priority over individuals.

With that said,

You may already have the dream caterer or ideal florist in mind for your Carmel Valley wedding and that’s great, given that Holman Ranch allows for it. However, bear in mind you’ve made an agreement with your venue and must make sure your wedding vendors follow the rules outlined in your contract. It’ll be you who pays for any damages that they cause!

It may seem obvious, but the vendor driving their truck or the caterer that leaves the kitchen in a terrible state likely will not worry nor care should their mistakes cost you extra fees. Just food for thought.

So if you’re looking to have a less stressful wedding here in Carmel Valley, we highly recommend seeking out a venue that has a recommended wedding professional list in place, like Holman Ranch!


Wild Mustangs Still Roam Free, But Many Of These Magnificent Animals Need A Safe Home

Wild horses embody the mythic Old West, and free-roaming painted mustangs — original descendants from colonial Spanish horses — still live in the tens of thousands on federal land.

At the turn of the 20th century, feral mustangs (because they are descended from once-domesticated horses, they are properly defined as feral) numbered in the millions, but most were rounded up, slaughtered, and used for pet food or fertilizer. By 1970, only 17,000 of these magnificent horses remained.

Today, mustang herds vary in the degree to which they can be traced to original Iberian horses. Some contain a greater genetic mixture of ranch stock and more recent breeds, while others are relatively unchanged from the original stock, mostly among isolated populations.

In 1971, Congress passed a law that declared wild horses “living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West” and made it a crime for anyone to harass or kill them on most federal land. The law tasked the Bureau of Land Management with protecting the animals still roaming the range.

Protected horses naturally began to reproduce and by 1983 there were an estimated 65,000 horses and burros on the range, competing for resources with cattle and native wildlife.

To help create a sustainable balance, the BLM began removing horses from the wild (nearly 10,000 a year) and the wild population has numbered around 35,000. The captured horses are put up for adoption (the BLM hosts monthly Internet auctions on its website www.blm.gov/adoptahorse. Almost anyone can adopt a Mustang for as little as $125 as long as they sign a contract promising not to sell it to slaughter (something that used to happen quite frequently).

Investigations in the late 1980s and 1990s showed that many adopters, including several BLM employees, had turned a quick profit by selling the horses to slaughterhouses. To discourage such re-sales, the BLM began holding the title of sale for a year. Today the agency visits almost every adopter for a “compliance check” to ensure the horse’s well-being.

The restrictions, unfortunately, discouraged adoptions, and today only one in three captured horses finds a home. The rest go into a warren of taxpayer-funded corrals, feedlots and pastures collectively known as “the holding system.” Since horses often live 20 years after being captured, the holding population has grown steadily for decades from 1,600 in 1989 to more than 47,000. There are now more wild horses living in captivity than in the wild.

 

 

A key approach to placing excess animals has been advanced by Madeleine A. Pickens, former wife of oil magnate T. Boone Pickens, who seeks to create a private sanctuary in northern Nevada. There are also increased efforts to assist with finding appropriate adoption homes. One example is a promotional competition, The Extreme Mustang Makeover (www.extrememustangmakeover.com), that gives trainers 100 days to gentle and train 100 mustangs, which are then adopted through an auction.

So far EMM has taken more than 48,000 mustangs off the range, and has arranged more than 5,000 adoptions.


Planning Your Wedding? Be Sure To Factor In The Cost Of Tipping

Tipping is not considered obligatory, but it’s an accepted expression of gratitude for certain services granted. Just as we would never leave a restaurant without tipping our servers, those behind the efforts to pull off the perfect wedding should not be forgotten either.

 

 

 For potential brides and grooms, determining who should be tipped and how much that amount should be is often left to the very end — when they are already juggling dozens of other last-minute details.

 Here are a few guidelines to help you navigate this important element of your wedding:

  • Whether it’s one of the fathers, the best man or a maid of honor, assign someone the duty of handing out envelopes holding cash tips. Pay these either at the time of service (hair and makeup), at the end of the wedding (allowing you to adjust the tip to reflect the service), or at the beginning (vendors are more likely to provide excellent service if tipped before the wedding).
  • Traditionally, business owners of larger companies don’t get tipped — just their employees — but you can/should tip an owner when the service exceeds expectations. Small business owners should never be overlooked either, since their businesses are often run by just one person.
  • Wedding planners won’t likely expect anything; however, if yours exceeded expectations you can always give a small percentage of the total bill. Approximately 50 percent of couples do tip their planners, but these are typically those with holding more opulent weddings. Remember, non-monetary thank-yous such as professional photos of the wedding for the planner’s portfolio can go a long way, too.
  • If your officiant is affiliated with a church or synagogue, you’re normally expected to make a donation to that institution, and tipping the officiant is also appreciated. If you’re a member you’ll probably want to give a larger amount than if you’re not. However, if you’re getting married there and they’re charging you to use the space, feel free to give a smaller amount.
  • When it comes to bartenders, waitstaff, parking, bathroom, and coat-room attendants the rules of tipping are dictated by your contract. If the service fee is included, consider doling out extra only if the service was exceptional. If it’s not included, ask ahead of time how many attendants will be working your wedding and calculate on a per person basis.

Here is a general guideline for tipping amounts:

  • Bartenders: 10 percent of total liquor bill (split among them)
  • Bathroom attendants: $1 to $2 per guest
  • Catering manager: $200+ (or a personal gift)
  • Chef: $100+
  • Coat check attendants: $1 to $2 per guest
  • Hairstylist: 15 to 20 percent
  • Hotel chambermaids: $2 to $5 per room; $10 to $15 if you used a suite as your dressing room
  • Limo or bus drivers: 15 percent
  • Maitre d’hotel or headwaiter: 1 to 3 percent of food and beverage fees
  • Makeup artist: 15 to 20 percent
  • Musicians: 15 percent of fee for ceremony musicians; $25 to $50 per musician for reception
  • Photographer/videographer: $100
  • Valet or parking attendants: $1 to $2 per car; 15 percent for valet parking
  • Waiters: $20 and up each (distributed by the catering manager)
  • Wedding planner: 15 percent of fee (or a personal gift)

California Olive Oil Producers Opening Up Their Groves For A Close Up Look At A Fresh, Pure Product

For decades Americans have assumed that the only olive oils worth buying come from the Mediterranean, shipped across the Atlantic from Italy, Spain or Greece.

But in the last few decades, California producers have mounted a major new effort to bring back the domestic olive oil industry, planting thousands of acres, building new mills and producing oils that can be fresher, purer and cheaper than all but the finest imports.

 

The California olive oil trade, started by 16th-century Spanish missionaries, was almost dead 20 years ago, with only a few small producers doing business along the Pacific Coast and in the wine country.

Today, the state produces 99 percent of the extra-virgin olive oil consumed in the United States and 4 percent globally, according to the California Olive Oil Council. With that heightened reputation for freshness and quality, olive oil tourism in California is growing, with several producers opening their estates to the public.

For example, Seka Hilla in the Capay Valley, two hours northeast of San Francisco and run by the Indian tribe Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, has three oil varieties and shows guests how they are made. The tours include an oil sampling, a visit to the mill where the olives are pressed and bottled, and a stroll through the 82-acre orchards. Tours are free and arranged through the company’s website.

Holman Ranch in Carmel Valley tends its owns olive grove on a south-facing hill at its vineyard estate. The 100-tree grove — with multiple, mature cultivars, including Frantoio, Leccino, Mission, Coratina, Pendolino and Picholine — produces quality olives milled at a certified organic facility. Many guests at Holman find it fascinating to take a walking tour through the grove, particularly near harvest time in December.

Such tours are worth adding to a travel itinerary, according to Curtis Cord, publisher of the online Olive Oil Times. “The smaller producers in California are creating beautiful oils in exceptionally picturesque settings so you get double appreciation from each one you visit,” he said.

The rise in California olive oil comes at time when scrutiny still shrouds the foreign oil market. False labels and adulterated oil are common at many levels of the import marketplace. The American trade, much smaller and less prestigious, has not offered the same opportunities for fraud, and has remained relatively clean. This has given New World producers the opportunity to stake a claim that they can provide the purest oil.

Come see — and taste — for yourself.


If You Don’t Like Chardonnay, Give This Green-Skinned, Burgundian Grape Another Chance

Through the years Chardonnay has become a polarizing wine. While it remains the most popular grape in the world, it’s also the wine many people love to hate. The ABC (Anything But Chardonnay) crowd declares it as too big, too bold, too buttery, and too aggressively oaked.

Secondary fermentation allows benign bacterium to convert malic acid (that tart green apple flavor) into softer lactic acid (creamy or buttery tones). And the use (or overuse) of oak barrels creates that oakiness many find off-putting.

 

But there’s more behind this green-skinned, Burgundian grape than meets the eye — and the palate Here are some ABCs”.

  • Not all Chardonnay is buttery: Many winemakers don’t allow secondary fermentation to occur, and Chardonnay’s brightness and minerality come through in the finished product. A very ripe Chardonnay will have flavors of tropical fruit such as pineapple, guava and mango, while a barely ripe Chardonnay will have green apple and lemon flavors.
  • Unoaked Chardonnay lets the grape shine: Beginning in the 1980s American producers of Chardonnay began aggressively adding oak to the wine, leaving huge flavors of vanilla, toasted marshmallows and wood. Many people still love that style, but the tide is turning, and vintners now use stainless steel tanks in favor of oak barrels.
  • Bubbles and Chardonnay: If you find yourself drinking “Blanc de Blancs,” that bubbly comes solely from Chardonnay grapes. It’s the counterpart to the Blanc de Noirs (white from black), made from Pinot Noir. Blanc de Blancs was the first wine Schramsberg produced in 1965 and was America’s first commercially produced, Chardonnay-based brut sparkling wine.
  • Chardonnay is food friendly: If you’ve got a big, rich, California Chardonnay, fire up the grill and throw on a few steaks because that oaky, buttery wine goes well with beef. But don’t try to pair it with pungent cheeses. Instead, try soft or semi-soft creamy cheeses. Oaked chardonnays, especially those with a slight residual sugar, pair well with dishes having some sweetness themselves, a chicken breast with a tropical fruit salsa, or rich, buttered lobster. Bright, high-acid unoaked Chardonnay pairs better with foods high in salt, low in sweetness and with moderate fat or oil. Plainly prepared fish and raw oysters come to mind.
  • Many expressions of Chardonnay: Climate strongly influences the character of wine, and its effects are readily apparent in Chardonnay. Depending on where the grapes are grown, Chardonnay exhibits flavors ranging from tart lemon and apple to ripe, tropical pineapple. When produced in cooler climates, Chardonnay leans toward the former. Cool temperatures preserve the grape’s natural acidity. Flavors are reminiscent of citrus and apple, sometimes peach, often floral. In these regions, Chardonnay reflects the nature of the soil on which it was grown, with hints of minerality or chalk. Crisp and refreshing, these wines are elegant and perfectly food-friendly. In warmer climates, Chardonnay is ripe and tropical, with notes of pineapple, guava and mango, and a rounder mouth feel. So forget that oak-rich wine of the 1980s and ’90s. A whole wide world of Chardonnay awaits.

Couples Looking For An Exotic Wedding Ceremony Turn To Lions, Llamas And Elephants

Exotic animals are becoming the new must-have for couples seeking that unforgettable “wow” moment at their wedding. Because when dreaming of a perfect wedding, nothing says love quite like a spitting llama or a roaring lion.

But not everyone is keen on this new trend. These wild ceremonies can lead to logistical and legal issues, and animal rights groups stand firmly against the practice.

 

 

The most elaborate “wild” wedding that made news lately occurred In Las Vegas, where a groom of Indian descent rode atop an elephant in front of the Bellagio, while some hundreds of guests (and curious onlookers) danced around Tai, the 4.5-ton animal thought to bring the couple good luck.

That glitzy wedding addition in the desert cost the groom $10,000. Most exotic-animal weddings do not go that far, but the red tape is still extensive.

When used for entertainment purposes, these type of animals must be licensed and monitored by the federal government. Owners of exotics must file a travel itinerary and ensure there’s enough distance between the animal and the public.

Although couples are drawn to adding animals to their wedding or wedding photos because they want to be different, a lot of cities, such as Huntington Beach, Calif., have banned the trend (the law there has been in existence since 2002). States that have also initiated this ban are Indiana, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts and New York.

A way around all this is not to bring the animals to your ceremony, but to bring the ceremony to the animals. Zoos and aquariums can offer an inspiring, energizing and decidedly unique venue to create a memorable wedding. And, best of all, by supporting these institutions you’re helping them secure a better world for animals.

The San Diego Zoo or San Diego Zoo Safari Park arrange ceremonies against a unique backdrop. Couples can get married against the backdrop of a vast savanna while herds of rhinos, giraffes, and gazelles roam in the distance. Or perhaps a lush tropical setting on the edge of a lagoon filled with rare birds and plant life. If they want elephants they can do that, too. The Denver Zoo also does brisk wedding business. And in Cincinnati, the Newport Aquarium allows couples to rent out penguins for their nuptials

If all that sounds too elaborate, couples can have their own pets stand in as the guests of honor. Or pets can have a specific role (ring bearer or flower girl are common) in the ceremony.

But before giving your pets a starring role, think about whether this will be an enjoyable experience for them. Will they feel comfortable around your guests? Are they obedient and well behaved? After all, you wouldn’t want wild animals ruining the biggest day of your lives.


Swirl, Sip and Celebrate National Wine Day at Holman Ranch Vineyard & Winery Tasting Room in Carmel Valley Celebrate National Wine Day May 25th!

Press Contact: Marci Bracco (831) 747-7455

Swirl, Sip and Celebrate National Wine Day at Holman Ranch Vineyard
& Winery Tasting Room in Carmel Valley

Celebrate National Wine Day Wednesday, May 25th!

CARMEL VALLEY, CA – Celebrate National Wine Day Wednesday, May 25th.  Holman Ranch Tasting Room at 19 E. Carmel Valley Road in Carmel Valley, California will celebrate with buy one get one for 1 cent tastings between 11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 25th (valid for one buy one get one for 1 cent Estate tasting of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay per person.)

 

Holman Ranch’s Carmel Valley Village Tasting Room is the perfect backdrop to swirl, sip and savor the different complexities of Holman Ranch Vineyard and Winery wines. There is something for everyone, from the full-bodied Pinot Noirs to the light, fruity flavors of our Pinot Gris and lightly-oaked, food friendly Chardonnay. Holman Ranch also offers estate grown and bottled Extra Virgin Olive Oil available for tasting and purchase at the Tasting Room.

Stop by and celebrate National Wine Day! The list of benefits for drinking wine is getting longer and longer by the minute. A glass of wine a day has been shown to improve heart health, reduce forgetfulness, help you lose weight, boost your immunity, and help prevent bone loss.

Did you know? Wine has been produced for thousands of years all around the world. Archaeological sites in Macedonia uncovered evidence of early European wine production that date back more than 6,500 years! In China, traces of crushed grapes were found that are believed to be from the second and first millennium BC.

Evidence of wine’s popularity? There are over 20 million acres in the world dedicated to growing grapes for the sole purpose of making wine!

The tasting room is open daily from 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and is available for private events. 831-659-2640 www.holmanranch.com

Holman Ranch Vineyard and Winery Background:

Located at the north eastern tip of the Carmel Valley Appellation, the family-owned Holman Ranch resides approximately 12 miles inland from the Pacific Coast. Immersed in history and romance, the ranch has not only proven to be an excellent growing location for our vineyards but also for the Tuscan varietal olive trees which have flourished under the temperate climate.

Holman Ranch estate-grown wine varietals are planted on approximately 19 acres of undulating terrain. The wines produced are unfined and crafted to deliver the true varietal of the grape from harvest to bottle. The climate and terroir of the appellation has played a critical part in the success of their wines. The warmth of the inland valley coupled with the cooling marine layer has proven to be an ideal microclimate for the production of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris. The vineyards’ Burgundy Clones have thrived from the perfect blend of ideal climate, southern exposure and thin rocky soils.

The estate wines of Holman Ranch include: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Rosé of Pinot Noir. Carefully hand-harvested, cold pressed and bottled, the Extra Virgin Olive Oil produced from the fruits of our trees has a delightfully distinctive flavor.

Holman Ranch Background:

Holman Ranch: Where the Past is Always Present. Tucked away in the rolling hills of Carmel Valley, historic Holman Ranch provides a unique and memorable setting for weddings, special events, family gatherings, corporate retreats, and team-building events. With its charming gardens, stunning mountain views and serenity, this private estate affords old-world charm while providing modern day conveniences. This stunning Property includes a fully restored stone hacienda, overnight guest rooms, vineyards, olive grove, horse stables and more.

 


Sip, Swirl, Savor and Learn The Fifth Annual “In Your Backyard” Series Brought to you by Edible Monterey Bay and Holman Ranch Announces Its June 15th Class

Sip, Swirl, Savor and Learn

The Fifth Annual “In Your Backyard” Series Brought to you by

Edible Monterey Bay and Holman Ranch

Announces Its June 15th Class

June 15th will feature Kenneth Macdonald from Edgars at Quail Lodge in Carmel Valley who will take you from garden to table, discussing how to plant your garden with your menus in mind and providing tips for cooking your harvest. The evening will benefit Ag Against Hunger, which channels surplus fruits and vegetables from farms in our area to those in need. www.agagainsthunger.org

 

CARMEL, CA (April  2016)  Inspired by the culinary bounty of California’s Central Coast, Holman Ranch Tasting Room, located at 19 E. Carmel Valley Road in Carmel Valley Village, is working with Edible Monterey Bay to invite local culinary chefs and artisans to demonstrate how wine can be best complemented with fresh culinary products found throughout the Central Coast.

The “In Your Backyard” series brought to you by Edible Monterey Bay and Holman Ranch will have chefs, farmers sand foragers sharing their tips and techniques for finding the perfect, fresh ingredients for preparing truly memorable meals, side dishes as well as understanding flavor pairings. From paella to abalone and sea vegetable demos, the series will showcase local experts’ knowledgeable on everything from how to select the best meats to creating savory pastries with ingredients from the local Farmers Market. Each demonstration will offer recommendations for the best wine to pair with the featured culinary item.

Here is a sneak peek at our 2016 schedule, partners and charity beneficiaries:

  • June 15th will feature Kenneth Macdonald from Edgars at Quail Lodge in Carmel Valley who will take you from garden to table, discussing how to plant your garden with your menus in mind and providing tips for cooking your harvest. The evening will benefit Ag Against Hunger, which channels surplus fruits and vegetables from farms in our area to those in need. www.agagainsthunger.org
  •   July 14th, 6:00 PM – John Cox with Sierra Mar at Post Ranch in Big Sur and Trevor Fay of Monterey Abalone Co. will take up the theme “Cooking the Big Sur Coast,” showing you how to cook our local abalone and sea vegetables, and sharing how Monterey Abalone raises the iconic gastropod and forages for sea vegetables and rare seafood in Monterey Bay.   Charity Partner is the Grower Shipper Foundation.  The Grower-Shipper Association Foundation is a non-profit 501c(3) organization that provides education and information on the agriculture industry as well as offering innovative programs to our community outreach.  We are here to make our community aware of the positive impact agriculture makes to all our lives.  Help us to be a part of the solution to educate, inform and inspire.  www.growershipperfoundation.org

Reservations are required for all classes and the cost for each event is $25 per person. Classes are $10 for wine club members.  Class size is limited to 25 attendees.  This includes the class, wine tasting, small bites, and meeting, learning and sampling from a local artisan. A portion of the class proceeds will benefit the local charity organizations. To make reservations call 831-659-2640 or email [email protected].

Holman Ranch’s Carmel Valley Village Tasting Room is the perfect backdrop to swirl, sip and savor the different complexities of Holman Ranch Vineyard and Winery wines while learning about the culinary bounty available in your own backyard. The tasting room is open daily from 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and is available for private events.

About Holman Ranch Vineyard and Winery:

Located at the north eastern tip of the Carmel Valley Appellation, the family-owned Holman Ranch resides approximately 12 miles inland from the Pacific Coast. Immersed in history and romance, the ranch has not only proven to be an excellent growing location for our vineyards but also for the Tuscan varietal olive trees which have flourished under the temperate climate. Holman Ranch estate-grown wine varietals are planted on approximately 19 acres of undulating terrain. The wines produced are unfined and crafted to deliver the true varietal of the grape from harvest to bottle. The climate and terroir of the appellation has played a critical part in the success of their wines. The warmth of the inland valley coupled with the cooling marine layer has proven to be an ideal microclimate for the production of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris. The vineyards’ Burgundy Clones have thrived from the perfect blend of ideal climate, southern exposure and thin rocky soils.

The estate wines of Holman Ranch include: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Rosé of Pinot Noir. Carefully hand-harvested, cold pressed and bottled, the Extra Virgin Olive Oil produced from the fruits of our trees has a delightfully distinctive flavor.

Holman Ranch: Where the Past is Always Present. Tucked away in the rolling hills of Carmel Valley, historic Holman Ranch provides a unique and memorable setting for weddings, special events, family gatherings, corporate retreats, and team-building events. With its charming gardens, stunning mountain views and serenity, this private estate affords old-world charm while providing modern day conveniences. This stunning property includes a fully restored stone hacienda, overnight guest rooms, vineyards, olive grove, horse stables and more. www.holmanranch.com

About Edible Monterey Bay

Founded in 2011, Edible Monterey Bay produces a beautiful quarterly magazine and weekly email newsletter celebrating the local food cultures of Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito Counties, season by season. It also promotes local and sustainable regional food cultures through outstanding food and wine-themed events. For more information, go to www.ediblemontereybay.com or call (831) 298-7117.