Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Estate Wines and Jarman Wines Announce Three New Releases

CARMEL VALLEY, CA – Holman Ranch Vineyards and Winery Estate Wines and Jarman Wines Announce new releases.

The estate wines of Holman Ranch include: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Rosé of Pinot Noir. Holman Ranch’s 21 acres of vineyards lie between 950 and 1150 feet in elevation. The root stocks and soils are most important in producing excellent fruit from the vineyards.

The surrounding Santa Lucia Mountains are very important to Carmel Valley viticulture. The local hills hold back the marine layer and broad breezes, which is beneficial to producing consistently good fruit. Sedimentary soils, such as, chock rock and Carmel stone also play a major role in wine producing methods by providing good soil drainage. Holman Ranch “stresses the vines” of the fruit with emphasis on reproduction, which in turn, stops growth and ripens fruit. The valley configuration allows for fog in the morning but with it rapidly moving out as the air warms which is great for Pinot Noir grapes. The proximity to the ocean and the elevation are positive characteristics for the vines.

Holman Ranch’s vines are planted 15 degrees off due north which allows for all day sunlight on fruit zone and good protection from breeze. No chemical herbicides or pesticides are used on our fruit and we have received our sustainable and organic certification.  Holman Ranch is also 100% estate vineyards and winery.

Holman Ranch’s wines are unfined and crafted to deliver the true varietal of the grape from harvest to table. Purity and passion are key ingredients in the wine-making process, and this is where Holman Ranch truly stands out.

Jarman’s terroir (a French word that speaks to a wine’s place of origin, its subtle nuances of traceable character, flavor, lineage and integrity) refers to a special place in Carmel Valley — and also to a special woman, family matriarch Jarman Fearing Lowder, who inspired a family to bottle the essence of a mother’s spirit. The Jarman label reflects quality, with only the best local grapes used during an artisanal, small-batch winemaking process. Jarman wine uses only 100% estate-grown, organic and certified-sustainable grapes. Aged in French oak barrels, Jarman’s vintages are held in limited supply, and are not available anywhere outside their tasting room.

Holman Ranch and Jarman Wines Announce Three New Releases

Holman Ranch has three new releases this year. They will tantalize your taste buds, perhaps even become one of your favorites. From Holman Ranch, choose from a 2015 Rosé of Pinot Noir and a 2012 Heather’s Hill Pinot Noir. From Jarman there’s a plump and juicy 2014 Pinot Noir.

’15 – Rose of Pinot Noir

Whisps of strawberry and summer watermelon tickle the nose, while the bright and dry finish lingers on and on. Our ‘Blushing Bride” is perfect for your outdoor celebration, sipping on the patio with the one you love or enjoying with your favorite meal.

$22 per bottle

Wine Specs

  • Vintage 2015
  • Varietal Pinot Noir
  • Appellation Carmel Valley
  • Alcohol % 12.6

’12 – Heather’s Hill

This fun & fruity wine has notes of black pepper, black cherry and black licorice and finishes with a beautiful palate cleansing acidity.

$36

Wine Specs

  • Vintage 2012
  • Varietal Pinot Noir
  • Appellation Carmel Valley
  • Alcohol % 12.9

’14 – Jarman Pinot Noir

Our second take on Jarman Pinot Noir starts with a beautifully aromatic nose, full of baking spices and a velvety softness. At first sip, you’ll be bathed in rich warmth as flavors of cassis and blackberry jam mingle together and cravings of freshly baked pastry swirl in your mind. This 2014 Pinot Noir can be enjoyed now and will only get better with age.

$80

Wine Specs

  • Vintage 2014
  • Varietal Pinot Noir
  • Appellation Carmel Valley
  • Alcohol % 13.9

Wine Caves:

The winery at Holman Ranch, located in The Caves, is completely underground in order to take advantage of the natural cooling and humidity held below. The 3000 square foot area maintains a constant temperature of 58˚F-60 ˚F and contains four 750 gallon tanks, four 1200 gallon tanks, and four open top tanks that can hold two tons each. One hundred (100) French oak barrels are maintained year round. Winery operations such as destemming, pressing, fermenting and aging take place within the cool environment of The Caves, while bottling is done directly outside using a mobile bottling line. During harvest, 6 to 8 tons of grapes a day are processed. This may seem low but it is due to the fact that harvesting hours are between 7am to noon on any given day. Grapes are hand picked and loaded into half ton bins, transferred to the winery by tractor and then moved by forklift to the destemmer. White wines take around three weeks to ferment at 50˚F and are bottled in February, while red varietals ferment for two weeks and are bottled in early June. All skins, seeds and stems are composted and returned to the fields. Slow months for our winery are June, July and August with the busiest time being September. The winery will produce 3000-5000 cases annually.

Vineyard & Winery Background:

Located at the north eastern tip of the Carmel Valley Appellation, the family-owned Holman Ranch resides approximately 12 miles inland from the Pacific Coast. Immersed in history and romance, the ranch has not only proven to be an excellent growing location for our vineyards but also for the Tuscan varietal olive trees which have flourished under the temperate climate.

  • Our estate-grown wine varietals are planted on approximately 21 acres of undulating terrain.
  • The wines produced are unfined and crafted to deliver the true varietal of the grape from harvest to bottle.
  • The climate and terroir of the appellation has played a critical part in the success of our wines. The warmth of our inland valley coupled with the cooling marine layer has established itself as an ideal microclimate for the production of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris. Our Burgundy Clones have thrived from the perfect blend of ideal climate, southern exposure and thin rocky soils.

Holman Ranch Tasting Room:

Holman Ranch’s Carmel Valley tasting room offers the perfect backdrop to swirl, sip and savor the different complexities of Holman Ranch Vineyard and Winery wines. There is something for everyone (4 varietals in fact), from the full-bodied Pinot Noirs to the light, fruity flavors of our Pinot Gris and lightly oaked Chardonnay. Holman Ranch also offers estate grown and bottled Olive Oil available for tasting and purchase at the Tasting Room.

The Tasting Room showcases the estate wines of Holman Ranch which includes our Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Rosé of Pinot Noir. Carefully hand-harvested, cold pressed and bottled, the Extra Virgin Olive Oil produced from the fruits of our Tuscan trees has a delightful spice followed by a buttery finish.

Three tasting flights of three wines each (White, Mountain and Pinot Noir) are available 7 days a week. The Tasting Room also holds a series of cooking demos called In Your Backyard. For more information, call (831) 659-2640.

Olive Grove:

Holman Ranch has its own distinctive olive grove located on a south facing hill of our vineyard. The grove is comprised of 100 trees with multiple cultivars planted. These cultivars consist of 25 Frantoio, 25 Leccino, 10 Mission, 25 Coratina, 5 Pendolino, and 10 Picholine, all of which were originally planted in 2194 in a Carmel Valley orchard then replanted at Holman Ranch in 2007. These mature olive trees allowed us to produce olive oil right away. They are planted in shale for the best production and harvesting results possible. We harvest our fruit by hand in December, which is then milled, producing a superb, high quality product. Although the Olive Grove is not certified organic, we do employ organic practices when farming our trees. Our mill, however, is certified organic. An interesting fact is that olive trees are alternate bearing, which means that one year they may produce 650, 375ml bottles worth of oil, while next year they may produce only 50, 375ml bottles.

Holman Ranch Background:

Holman Ranch: Where the Past is Always Present. Tucked away in the rolling hills of Carmel Valley, Californian historic Holman Ranch provides a unique and memorable setting for weddings, special events, family gatherings, corporate retreats, and team-building events. With its charming gardens, stunning mountain views and serenity, this private estate affords old-world charm while providing modern day conveniences. This stunning Property includes a fully restored stone hacienda, overnight guest rooms, vineyards, olive grove, horse stables and more. www.holmanranch.com

About Jarman Wines:

Jarman’s terroir (a French word that speaks to a wine’s place of origin, its subtle nuances of traceable character, flavor, lineage and integrity) refers to a special place in Carmel Valley — and also to a special woman, family matriarch Jarman Fearing Lowder, who inspired a family to bottle the essence of a mother’s spirit. The Jarman label reflects quality, with only the best local grapes used during an artisanal, small-batch winemaking process. Jarman wine uses only 100% estate-grown, organic and certified-sustainable grapes. Aged in French oak barrels, Jarman’s vintages are held in limited supply, and are not available anywhere outside their tasting room.

The two varietals include:

>The 2013 Jarman Pinot Noir takes on nuances of warm blueberry pie, cloves and cinnamon that mingle in the nose with oak notes from 10 months in the barrel. The mouth-feel is plump and juicy with overtones of cassis and blackberries.

>The 2014 Jarman Chardonnay features floral notes reminiscent of walking by a parfumerie in France — subtle and pleasant with a hint of earthiness. When serving this wine lightly chilled, rich notes of underripe berries and raw honey will waltz across your palate.

To further honor their mother’s memory, the family has opened a special tasting room in Carmel Valley Village (open noon to 5 p.m., Thurs.-Sun.; or by appointment) next to Will’s Fargo Steakhouse + Bar, the restaurant they purchased in 2014. The tastings will feature full-fledged experiences, including tours and wine education, and each will include a food element that complements the wine. The new Jarman tasting room will provide visitors with three unique experiences: Cru Tasting, Premier Cru Experience and the Grand Cru Experience.

Jarman Tasting Lounge and Patio, 18 West Carmel Valley Road, Carmel Valley, CA.  For more information call Jarman Tasting Lounge and Patio at 831-298-7300 or email [email protected].


Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Estate Wines and Jarman Wines Win Awards From The 2016 International Women’s Wine Competition

Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Estate Wines and Jarman Wines Wins

Awards From The 2016 International Women’s Wine Competition

CARMEL VALLEY, CA –Vineyard & Winery Management has announced the results of the 2016 International Women’s Wine Competition (IWWC), Holman Ranch Vineyards and Winery Estate Wines and Jarman Wines wins awards from the 2016 International Women’s Wine Competition.

The estate wines of Holman Ranch include: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Rosé of Pinot Noir. Holman Ranch’s 21 acres of vineyards lie between 950 and 1150 feet in elevation. The root stocks and soils are most important in producing excellent fruit from the vineyards.

The surrounding Santa Lucia Mountains are very important to Carmel Valley viticulture. The local hills hold back the marine layer and broad breezes, which is beneficial to producing consistently good fruit. Sedimentary soils, such as, chock rock and Carmel stone also play a major role in wine producing methods by providing good soil drainage. Holman Ranch “stresses the vines” of the fruit with emphasis on reproduction, which in turn, stops growth and ripens fruit. The valley configuration allows for fog in the morning but with it rapidly moving out as the air warms which is great for Pinot Noir grapes. The proximity to the ocean and the elevation are positive characteristics for the vines.

Holman Ranch’s vines are planted 15 degrees off due north which allows for all day sunlight on fruit zone and good protection from breeze. No chemical herbicides or pesticides are used on our fruit and we have received our sustainable and organic certification.  Holman Ranch is also 100% estate vineyards and winery.

Holman Ranch’s wines are unfined and crafted to deliver the true varietal of the grape from harvest to table. Purity and passion are key ingredients in the wine-making process, and this is where Holman Ranch truly stands out.

Jarman’s terroir (a French word that speaks to a wine’s place of origin, its subtle nuances of traceable character, flavor, lineage and integrity) refers to a special place in Carmel Valley — and also to a special woman, family matriarch Jarman Fearing Lowder, who inspired a family to bottle the essence of a mother’s spirit. The Jarman label reflects quality, with only the best local grapes used during an artisanal, small-batch winemaking process. Jarman wine uses only 100% estate-grown, organic and certified-sustainable grapes. Aged in French oak barrels, Jarman’s vintages are held in limited supply, and are not available anywhere outside their tasting room.

Holman Ranch and Jarman Wines Announce they have won the following 2016 International Women’s Wine Competitions:

Wine

Price

Award

2013 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Kelly’s Press

$26.00

Double Gold

2015 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Rose of Pinot Noir

$22.00

Gold, Best of Class, Best of Show Rose

2013 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Pinot Gris

$17.00

Gold

2015 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery .5 Degrees Brix

$19.00

Silver

2013 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Big Daddy

$45.00

Silver

2014 Jarman Chardonnay

$45.00

Silver

2012 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Heather’s Hill

$38.00

Silver

2013 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Sweet Love

$30.00

Silver

2013 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Virgin Chardonnay

$21.00

Silver

2014 Jarman Pinot Noir

$80.00

Silver

2013 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Sauvignon Blanc

$19.00

Bronze

2011 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Hunter’s Cuvee

$41.00

Bronze

2012 Holman Ranch Vineyards & Winery Pinot Noir

$34.00

Bronze

 

About Vineyard & Winery Management

Based in Santa Rosa, Calif., Vineyard & Winery Management is an independently owned and operated multimedia company that produces an international wine trade publication, conferences, trade shows and wine competitions. The family-owned company publishes Vineyard & Winery Management magazine, which has the highest circulation of any North American wine trade publication. V&WM’s conferences and trade shows include Craft Beverages Unlimited East and Craft Beverages Unlimited Midwest. Its wine competitions include The Press Democrat North Coast Wine Challenge, Grand Harvest Awards, East Meets West (formerly International Eastern Wine Competition and West Coast Wine Competition), and the International Women’s Wine Competition. See vwmmedia.com for more information.

Wine Caves:

The winery at Holman Ranch, located in The Caves, is completely underground in order to take advantage of the natural cooling and humidity held below. The 3000 square foot area maintains a constant temperature of 58˚F-60 ˚F and contains four 750 gallon tanks, four 1200 gallon tanks, and four open top tanks that can hold two tons each. One hundred (100) French oak barrels are maintained year round. Winery operations such as destemming, pressing, fermenting and aging take place within the cool environment of The Caves, while bottling is done directly outside using a mobile bottling line. During harvest, 6 to 8 tons of grapes a day are processed. This may seem low but it is due to the fact that harvesting hours are between 7am to noon on any given day. Grapes are hand picked and loaded into half ton bins, transferred to the winery by tractor and then moved by forklift to the destemmer. White wines take around three weeks to ferment at 50˚F and are bottled in February, while red varietals ferment for two weeks and are bottled in early June. All skins, seeds and stems are composted and returned to the fields. Slow months for our winery are June, July and August with the busiest time being September. The winery will produce 3000-5000 cases annually.

Vineyard & Winery Background:

Located at the north eastern tip of the Carmel Valley Appellation, the family-owned Holman Ranch resides approximately 12 miles inland from the Pacific Coast. Immersed in history and romance, the ranch has not only proven to be an excellent growing location for our vineyards but also for the Tuscan varietal olive trees which have flourished under the temperate climate.

  • Our estate-grown wine varietals are planted on approximately 21 acres of undulating terrain.
  • The wines produced are unfined and crafted to deliver the true varietal of the grape from harvest to bottle.
  • The climate and terroir of the appellation has played a critical part in the success of our wines. The warmth of our inland valley coupled with the cooling marine layer has established itself as an ideal microclimate for the production of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris. Our Burgundy Clones have thrived from the perfect blend of ideal climate, southern exposure and thin rocky soils.

Holman Ranch Tasting Room:

Holman Ranch’s Carmel Valley tasting room offers the perfect backdrop to swirl, sip and savor the different complexities of Holman Ranch Vineyard and Winery wines. There is something for everyone (4 varietals in fact), from the full-bodied Pinot Noirs to the light, fruity flavors of our Pinot Gris and lightly oaked Chardonnay. Holman Ranch also offers estate grown and bottled Olive Oil available for tasting and purchase at the Tasting Room.

The Tasting Room showcases the estate wines of Holman Ranch which includes our Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Rosé of Pinot Noir. Carefully hand-harvested, cold pressed and bottled, the Extra Virgin Olive Oil produced from the fruits of our Tuscan trees has a delightful spice followed by a buttery finish.

Three tasting flights of three wines each (White, Mountain and Pinot Noir) are available 7 days a week. The Tasting Room also holds a series of cooking demos called In Your Backyard. For more information, call (831) 659-2640.

Olive Grove:

Holman Ranch has its own distinctive olive grove located on a south facing hill of our vineyard. The grove is comprised of 100 trees with multiple cultivars planted. These cultivars consist of 25 Frantoio, 25 Leccino, 10 Mission, 25 Coratina, 5 Pendolino, and 10 Picholine, all of which were originally planted in 2194 in a Carmel Valley orchard then replanted at Holman Ranch in 2007. These mature olive trees allowed us to produce olive oil right away. They are planted in shale for the best production and harvesting results possible. We harvest our fruit by hand in December, which is then milled, producing a superb, high quality product. Although the Olive Grove is not certified organic, we do employ organic practices when farming our trees. Our mill, however, is certified organic. An interesting fact is that olive trees are alternate bearing, which means that one year they may produce 650, 375ml bottles worth of oil, while next year they may produce only 50, 375ml bottles.

About Holman Ranch:

Holman Ranch: Where the Past is Always Present. Tucked away in the rolling hills of Carmel Valley, Californian historic Holman Ranch provides a unique and memorable setting for weddings, special events, family gatherings, corporate retreats, and team-building events. With its charming gardens, stunning mountain views and serenity, this private estate affords old-world charm while providing modern day conveniences. This stunning Property includes a fully restored stone hacienda, overnight guest rooms, vineyards, olive grove, horse stables and more. www.holmanranch.com

Jarman Tasting Lounge and Patio, 16 West Carmel Valley Road, Carmel Valley, CA.  For more information call Jarman Tasting Lounge and Patio at 831-298-7300 or email [email protected].

About Jarman Wines:

Jarman’s terroir (a French word that speaks to a wine’s place of origin, its subtle nuances of traceable character, flavor, lineage and integrity) refers to a special place in Carmel Valley — and also to a special woman, family matriarch Jarman Fearing Lowder, who inspired a family to bottle the essence of a mother’s spirit. The Jarman label reflects quality, with only the best local grapes used during an artisanal, small-batch winemaking process. Jarman wine uses only 100% estate-grown, organic and certified-sustainable grapes. Aged in French oak barrels, Jarman’s vintages are held in limited supply, and are not available anywhere outside their tasting room.

The two varietals include:

>The 2013 Jarman Pinot Noir takes on nuances of warm blueberry pie, cloves and cinnamon that mingle in the nose with oak notes from 10 months in the barrel. The mouth-feel is plump and juicy with overtones of cassis and blackberries.

>The 2014 Jarman Chardonnay features floral notes reminiscent of walking by a parfumerie in France — subtle and pleasant with a hint of earthiness. When serving this wine lightly chilled, rich notes of underripe berries and raw honey will waltz across your palate.

To further honor their mother’s memory, the family has opened a special tasting room in Carmel Valley Village open daily next to Will’s Fargo Restaurant and Bar, the restaurant they purchased in 2014. The tastings will feature full-fledged experiences, including tours and wine education, and each will include a food element that complements the wine. The new Jarman tasting room will provide visitors with three unique experiences: Cru Tasting, Premier Cru Experience and the Grand Cru Experience.


America’s Latest Craze, Pokémon Go, Contains Built-In Bonus For Users — Outdoor Exercise

For several years advances in technology have led to reduced physical activity and increased time motionless, with people staring at an electronic device.

That’s why those who lament the growing electronic-based world are praising the latest craze taking the country by storm — Pokémon Go.

 

pokemon2

 

What is Pokémon Go, you ask? It’s a location-based, augmented reality mobile game released in July of 2016 for iOS and Android devices. The downloadable app is based on the wildly popular Pokémon craze of the 1990s, which featured colorful Japanese cartoon characters. It seems as though everyone in America is playing the game, with an estimated 9.5 million daily active users — an astronomical figure.

Pokémon Go allows users to walk around their communities, “capturing” those characters. And whether it’s lumbering up a hill to catch up with Pikachu, or trekking several blocks just to nab Magnemite, Pokémon Go players are getting some actual exercise.

The app uses the smartphone’s camera, so that when you look at your phone, you see a Pokémon character superimposed over a real-world object, a feature known as augmented reality. Different types of Pokémon appear in different locations, so players need to explore the world around them to catch different characters.

As an added bonus, Pokémon Go players are walking miles and miles each day to play the game, boosting their overall physical activity. For some it’s the most active and social they have been in months.

Experts in sports medicine and obesity prevention welcomed the news.

“Anything that gets people up off their couch … and out in the real world moving around I think is a wonderful thing,” said Dr. Michael Jonesco, a sports medicine physician at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

Pokémon Go is more likely to result in a higher degree of activity than many previous “exergames” because it requires users to walk around, whereas many previous exergames could actually be played with very little activity. And players might not even feel like they’re exercising, in part because the game is providing them with novel goals rather than setting a specific amount of activity to work toward.

In addition, the game allows users to meet other people in the real world, for example, at landmarks where there are many Pokémon. This could result in new friendships that are built around being active.

The only drawback so far is players wandering onto private property, or into venues such as libraries or churches, where it isn’t appropriate to venture in pursuit of virtual characters.

How long this craze lasts is anyone’s guess. But, for now, brace yourself for the world of Pokémon Go.


More And More Modern Brides Tattooing Their Ceremonies With Body Art

In a trend that to most seemed unthinkable just a decade ago, modern brides and grooms are stamping their ceremonies with ink — permanent ink in the form of tattoos.

 It makes sense, right? If marriage is indeed forever, then making a long-lasting commitment to your partner via a tattoo is the perfect way to pay homage to your lifelong love.

Tattoos are showing up at the altar in unique ways:

Tattooed wedding bands

 

 

Today’s couples find themselves not wanting to stick with the traditional wedding bands or wedding rings. Changing it up a bit with a tattooed wedding band or a design not only shows creativity, but commitment. Wedding-related Internet sites and blogs show couples getting full ring tattoos around their ring finger or creating a personal design to be placed on top of the ring finger that matches their spouses (such as a heart). These tattoos also save them money over the cost of traditional jewelery, and of course it cannot be lost or stolen like a real ring could.

The simplicity of these tattoos is appealing to most brides and grooms. A motif as simple as a tiny heart or script phrase can have meaning but is not distracting. Plus, couples can strategically place their ink inside of their ring fingers or on a not-often-exposed part of your shoulder.

Exposed body tattoos

A recent poll suggests that 24 percent of Americans between the ages of 18 and 50 are tattooed. Americans under age 45 are twice as likely as those 45 and over to have one (31 percent vs. 14 percent). And the number goes up as the age goes down: A third of those under age 30 have a tattoo (34 percent).

What’s eye-rising, too, is the gender gap: Nearly half of women under age 35 have ink, almost double their male counterparts (47 percent vs. 25 percent).

Brides who love body art feel it is an expression of who they are inside and out — and many want to incorporate that into their wedding-day look by choosing a dress that better shows off the designs.

Those who need to hide tattoos out of concern for more conservative family members go to great lengths to conceal them. That can be done through theatrical makeup, a well-designed dress or custom-made features such as sleeves, a light bolero made of the same fabric as the gown or a well-placed appliqué.

Temporary tattoos

Couples who love the idea of sporting tattoos on the big day, may want to turn to henna, a natural plant that has been used for centuries to dye skin, hair, fingernails, leather and wood.

Bridal henna is one of the oldest wedding traditions in the Middle East. Henna Nights have become a tradition even amongst young and more modern brides-to-be, and that tradition has gravitated to the western world.

Henna needs 2-3 days to mature and become darker in color once applied on your hands and feet. But remember, henna tattoos are temporary; they will fade away in a couple of weeks.

Traditionally, in some countries, the groom’s initials are hidden in the patterns. The groom must search for the initials on the wedding night, if he can’t find his initials he is expected to give a gift to the bride!


Holman Ranch’s 88th Annual Fiesta de los Amigos to be Held on September 8th – The Ranch’s Birthday Celebration will benefit the Alzheimer’s Association

CARMEL VALLEY, CA

Holman Ranch will be celebrating its birthday on September 8th from 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. with its Annual Fiesta del los Amigos and a benefit for the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Fiesta de los Amigos – a part of Holman Ranch’s history! The popular Fiesta de los Amigos which began in 1928, the Ranch’s birthday celebration, was an annual highlight, often attracting more than 2,000 guests. In the 1960’s – 1980’s the Ranch was known for its rodeos and horse shows, daily trail rides, barbecues, and fiestas filled the calendar.

This year, the celebration will be filled with flavorful food, Holman Ranch estate wines to sip, lively entertainment to enjoy and more! Capture the moment of the Fiesta in our own photo booth or head to the game tent and enjoy games for the entire family.

Special guest appearances will include: 

Chef Greg, Wills Fargo

Chef Brandon, Mundaka

Chef Ted, Passion Fish

Chef Brad, La Balena

Chef Kenneth, Edgar’s at Quail Lodge

In addition, attendees can sign up to support the Holman Ranch team for the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. The walk will be held on October 8, 2016 and depart from Custom House Plaza in Monterey. Attendees can sign up to join the team or pledge their support!

The event will cost $50 per person or wine club members get 2 free tickets and all additional wine club member tickets are $35 per person. If the event is not sold out, tickets will be available at the door for $60.00 per person. Five dollars from each ticket sale will be donated to the Alzheimer Association. RSVP is required. RSVP by September 2nd to (831) 659-2640. Upon confirmation by Holman Ranch of your RSVP, you will be provided a gate pass to Holman Ranch.

Holman Ranch Vineyard and Winery Background:

Located at the north eastern tip of the Carmel Valley Appellation, the family-owned Holman Ranch resides approximately 12 miles inland from the Pacific Coast. Immersed in history and romance, the ranch has not only proven to be an excellent growing location for our vineyards but also for the Tuscan varietal olive trees which have flourished under the temperate climate.

Holman Ranch estate-grown wine varietals are planted on approximately 19 acres of undulating terrain. The wines produced are unfined and crafted to deliver the true varietal of the grape from harvest to bottle. The climate and terroir of the appellation has played a critical part in the success of their wines. The warmth of the inland valley coupled with the cooling marine layer has proven to be an ideal microclimate for the production of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris. The vineyards’ Burgundy Clones have thrived from the perfect blend of ideal climate, southern exposure and thin rocky soils.

The estate wines of Holman Ranch include: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Rosé of Pinot Noir. Carefully hand-harvested, cold pressed and bottled, the Extra Virgin Olive Oil produced from the fruits of our trees has a delightfully distinctive flavor.

Holman Ranch Background:

Holman Ranch: Where the Past is Always Present. Tucked away in the rolling hills of Carmel Valley, historic Holman Ranch provides a unique and memorable setting for weddings, special events, family gatherings, corporate retreats, and team-building events. With its charming gardens, stunning mountain views and serenity, this private estate affords old-world charm while providing modern day conveniences. This stunning Property includes a fully restored stone hacienda, overnight guest rooms, vineyards, olive grove, horse stables and more. 


Harvard Study Shows Consuming Foods Rich In Flavonoids — Including Red Wine — Can Curb Weight Gain In Older Adults

Recent studies have shown diets that include wine can improve heart health. Now, a review of several large studies has found strong evidence of a link between keeping trim and the polyphenolic compounds found in wine and many fruits and vegetables.

Flavonoids are naturally occurring compounds that are found in specific fruits and vegetables, including grapes, blueberries, apples, pears and prunes.

The three-study analysis conducted by researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at the eating patterns of more than 120,000 participants to determine whether foods rich in flavonoids had any effects on managing body weight.

 

 

Researchers looked at diet, exercise and lifestyle data from middle-aged and older people. They found that those who ate diets rich in flavonoid-filled foods maintained their weight better than people who didn’t, even after adjusting for smoking and fitness activities. Some even lost a little weight.

The Harvard study centered on seven specific subclasses of flavonoids. Wine, especially red wine, is high in dietary flavonoids. The principal flavonoids consumed by the participants were anthocyanins, which were derived from blueberries and strawberries, flavan-3-ols, acquired from beer, tea and apples, and flavones from oranges, onions, teas, beer and wine.

Earlier studies revealed that flavonoids might increase energy expenditure, decrease fat absorption and work as an anti-inflammatory, along with with showing antioxidant qualities.

The researchers observed a significant correlation between a diet that is heavy in fruits, vegetables and flavonoid-heavy drinks, and participants who were healthier overall and less overweight.

 It’s important to note that flavonoids aren’t some miracle weight loss cure. Instead, they’re a way to curb your natural weight gain as you grow older.

So how much weight can you expect not to gain when taking more flavonoids?

Researchers observed that every extra daily standard deviation — a unit that varied by produce type — of flavonoids was associated with 0.16 to 0.23 pounds of less weight gained over 4 years.

While the study was observational, the authors expressed hope that people might eat more fruit if they knew a favorite berry helps with weight loss. Most Americans eat less than a cup of fruit and less than two cups of vegetables a day, research has shown.

Don’t feel like eating fruits or vegetables today? Why not pour yourself a glass of red wine? Red wine contains many of the same flavonoid benefits as grapes and grape juice. A single glass can provide you with high levels of anthocyanins along with flavonoids such as quercetin and myricetin.

Being obese or overweight decreases your life expectancy since it increases your risk for chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

So take your mother’s advice: Eat your fruits and vegetables. You may live longer — or at least earn a new wardrobe.


Wild Mustangs Still Roam Free, But Many Of These Magnificent Animals Need A Safe Home

Wild horses embody the mythic Old West, and free-roaming painted mustangs — original descendants from colonial Spanish horses — still live in the tens of thousands on federal land.

At the turn of the 20th century, feral mustangs (because they are descended from once-domesticated horses, they are properly defined as feral) numbered in the millions, but most were rounded up, slaughtered, and used for pet food or fertilizer. By 1970, only 17,000 of these magnificent horses remained.

Today, mustang herds vary in the degree to which they can be traced to original Iberian horses. Some contain a greater genetic mixture of ranch stock and more recent breeds, while others are relatively unchanged from the original stock, mostly among isolated populations.

In 1971, Congress passed a law that declared wild horses “living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West” and made it a crime for anyone to harass or kill them on most federal land. The law tasked the Bureau of Land Management with protecting the animals still roaming the range.

Protected horses naturally began to reproduce and by 1983 there were an estimated 65,000 horses and burros on the range, competing for resources with cattle and native wildlife.

To help create a sustainable balance, the BLM began removing horses from the wild (nearly 10,000 a year) and the wild population has numbered around 35,000. The captured horses are put up for adoption (the BLM hosts monthly Internet auctions on its website www.blm.gov/adoptahorse. Almost anyone can adopt a Mustang for as little as $125 as long as they sign a contract promising not to sell it to slaughter (something that used to happen quite frequently).

Investigations in the late 1980s and 1990s showed that many adopters, including several BLM employees, had turned a quick profit by selling the horses to slaughterhouses. To discourage such re-sales, the BLM began holding the title of sale for a year. Today the agency visits almost every adopter for a “compliance check” to ensure the horse’s well-being.

The restrictions, unfortunately, discouraged adoptions, and today only one in three captured horses finds a home. The rest go into a warren of taxpayer-funded corrals, feedlots and pastures collectively known as “the holding system.” Since horses often live 20 years after being captured, the holding population has grown steadily for decades from 1,600 in 1989 to more than 47,000. There are now more wild horses living in captivity than in the wild.

 

 

A key approach to placing excess animals has been advanced by Madeleine A. Pickens, former wife of oil magnate T. Boone Pickens, who seeks to create a private sanctuary in northern Nevada. There are also increased efforts to assist with finding appropriate adoption homes. One example is a promotional competition, The Extreme Mustang Makeover (www.extrememustangmakeover.com), that gives trainers 100 days to gentle and train 100 mustangs, which are then adopted through an auction.

So far EMM has taken more than 48,000 mustangs off the range, and has arranged more than 5,000 adoptions.


Planning Your Wedding? Be Sure To Factor In The Cost Of Tipping

Tipping is not considered obligatory, but it’s an accepted expression of gratitude for certain services granted. Just as we would never leave a restaurant without tipping our servers, those behind the efforts to pull off the perfect wedding should not be forgotten either.

 

 

 For potential brides and grooms, determining who should be tipped and how much that amount should be is often left to the very end — when they are already juggling dozens of other last-minute details.

 Here are a few guidelines to help you navigate this important element of your wedding:

  • Whether it’s one of the fathers, the best man or a maid of honor, assign someone the duty of handing out envelopes holding cash tips. Pay these either at the time of service (hair and makeup), at the end of the wedding (allowing you to adjust the tip to reflect the service), or at the beginning (vendors are more likely to provide excellent service if tipped before the wedding).
  • Traditionally, business owners of larger companies don’t get tipped — just their employees — but you can/should tip an owner when the service exceeds expectations. Small business owners should never be overlooked either, since their businesses are often run by just one person.
  • Wedding planners won’t likely expect anything; however, if yours exceeded expectations you can always give a small percentage of the total bill. Approximately 50 percent of couples do tip their planners, but these are typically those with holding more opulent weddings. Remember, non-monetary thank-yous such as professional photos of the wedding for the planner’s portfolio can go a long way, too.
  • If your officiant is affiliated with a church or synagogue, you’re normally expected to make a donation to that institution, and tipping the officiant is also appreciated. If you’re a member you’ll probably want to give a larger amount than if you’re not. However, if you’re getting married there and they’re charging you to use the space, feel free to give a smaller amount.
  • When it comes to bartenders, waitstaff, parking, bathroom, and coat-room attendants the rules of tipping are dictated by your contract. If the service fee is included, consider doling out extra only if the service was exceptional. If it’s not included, ask ahead of time how many attendants will be working your wedding and calculate on a per person basis.

Here is a general guideline for tipping amounts:

  • Bartenders: 10 percent of total liquor bill (split among them)
  • Bathroom attendants: $1 to $2 per guest
  • Catering manager: $200+ (or a personal gift)
  • Chef: $100+
  • Coat check attendants: $1 to $2 per guest
  • Hairstylist: 15 to 20 percent
  • Hotel chambermaids: $2 to $5 per room; $10 to $15 if you used a suite as your dressing room
  • Limo or bus drivers: 15 percent
  • Maitre d’hotel or headwaiter: 1 to 3 percent of food and beverage fees
  • Makeup artist: 15 to 20 percent
  • Musicians: 15 percent of fee for ceremony musicians; $25 to $50 per musician for reception
  • Photographer/videographer: $100
  • Valet or parking attendants: $1 to $2 per car; 15 percent for valet parking
  • Waiters: $20 and up each (distributed by the catering manager)
  • Wedding planner: 15 percent of fee (or a personal gift)

California Olive Oil Producers Opening Up Their Groves For A Close Up Look At A Fresh, Pure Product

For decades Americans have assumed that the only olive oils worth buying come from the Mediterranean, shipped across the Atlantic from Italy, Spain or Greece.

But in the last few decades, California producers have mounted a major new effort to bring back the domestic olive oil industry, planting thousands of acres, building new mills and producing oils that can be fresher, purer and cheaper than all but the finest imports.

 

The California olive oil trade, started by 16th-century Spanish missionaries, was almost dead 20 years ago, with only a few small producers doing business along the Pacific Coast and in the wine country.

Today, the state produces 99 percent of the extra-virgin olive oil consumed in the United States and 4 percent globally, according to the California Olive Oil Council. With that heightened reputation for freshness and quality, olive oil tourism in California is growing, with several producers opening their estates to the public.

For example, Seka Hilla in the Capay Valley, two hours northeast of San Francisco and run by the Indian tribe Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, has three oil varieties and shows guests how they are made. The tours include an oil sampling, a visit to the mill where the olives are pressed and bottled, and a stroll through the 82-acre orchards. Tours are free and arranged through the company’s website.

Holman Ranch in Carmel Valley tends its owns olive grove on a south-facing hill at its vineyard estate. The 100-tree grove — with multiple, mature cultivars, including Frantoio, Leccino, Mission, Coratina, Pendolino and Picholine — produces quality olives milled at a certified organic facility. Many guests at Holman find it fascinating to take a walking tour through the grove, particularly near harvest time in December.

Such tours are worth adding to a travel itinerary, according to Curtis Cord, publisher of the online Olive Oil Times. “The smaller producers in California are creating beautiful oils in exceptionally picturesque settings so you get double appreciation from each one you visit,” he said.

The rise in California olive oil comes at time when scrutiny still shrouds the foreign oil market. False labels and adulterated oil are common at many levels of the import marketplace. The American trade, much smaller and less prestigious, has not offered the same opportunities for fraud, and has remained relatively clean. This has given New World producers the opportunity to stake a claim that they can provide the purest oil.

Come see — and taste — for yourself.


If You Don’t Like Chardonnay, Give This Green-Skinned, Burgundian Grape Another Chance

Through the years Chardonnay has become a polarizing wine. While it remains the most popular grape in the world, it’s also the wine many people love to hate. The ABC (Anything But Chardonnay) crowd declares it as too big, too bold, too buttery, and too aggressively oaked.

Secondary fermentation allows benign bacterium to convert malic acid (that tart green apple flavor) into softer lactic acid (creamy or buttery tones). And the use (or overuse) of oak barrels creates that oakiness many find off-putting.

 

But there’s more behind this green-skinned, Burgundian grape than meets the eye — and the palate Here are some ABCs”.

  • Not all Chardonnay is buttery: Many winemakers don’t allow secondary fermentation to occur, and Chardonnay’s brightness and minerality come through in the finished product. A very ripe Chardonnay will have flavors of tropical fruit such as pineapple, guava and mango, while a barely ripe Chardonnay will have green apple and lemon flavors.
  • Unoaked Chardonnay lets the grape shine: Beginning in the 1980s American producers of Chardonnay began aggressively adding oak to the wine, leaving huge flavors of vanilla, toasted marshmallows and wood. Many people still love that style, but the tide is turning, and vintners now use stainless steel tanks in favor of oak barrels.
  • Bubbles and Chardonnay: If you find yourself drinking “Blanc de Blancs,” that bubbly comes solely from Chardonnay grapes. It’s the counterpart to the Blanc de Noirs (white from black), made from Pinot Noir. Blanc de Blancs was the first wine Schramsberg produced in 1965 and was America’s first commercially produced, Chardonnay-based brut sparkling wine.
  • Chardonnay is food friendly: If you’ve got a big, rich, California Chardonnay, fire up the grill and throw on a few steaks because that oaky, buttery wine goes well with beef. But don’t try to pair it with pungent cheeses. Instead, try soft or semi-soft creamy cheeses. Oaked chardonnays, especially those with a slight residual sugar, pair well with dishes having some sweetness themselves, a chicken breast with a tropical fruit salsa, or rich, buttered lobster. Bright, high-acid unoaked Chardonnay pairs better with foods high in salt, low in sweetness and with moderate fat or oil. Plainly prepared fish and raw oysters come to mind.
  • Many expressions of Chardonnay: Climate strongly influences the character of wine, and its effects are readily apparent in Chardonnay. Depending on where the grapes are grown, Chardonnay exhibits flavors ranging from tart lemon and apple to ripe, tropical pineapple. When produced in cooler climates, Chardonnay leans toward the former. Cool temperatures preserve the grape’s natural acidity. Flavors are reminiscent of citrus and apple, sometimes peach, often floral. In these regions, Chardonnay reflects the nature of the soil on which it was grown, with hints of minerality or chalk. Crisp and refreshing, these wines are elegant and perfectly food-friendly. In warmer climates, Chardonnay is ripe and tropical, with notes of pineapple, guava and mango, and a rounder mouth feel. So forget that oak-rich wine of the 1980s and ’90s. A whole wide world of Chardonnay awaits.